∞ BIOHERBY ∞| GOOGLE PRIVACY EU - USER |∞ GDPR & MORE

Google - EU user consent policy, USA consent policy, Data, Privacy, Ads, Cookies, Analytics, re-marketing - GDPR -and More! Bioherby 

Google - EU user consent policy, USA consent policy, Data, Privacy, Ads, Cookies, Analytics, re-marketing - GDPR -and More! Bioherby 

GOOGLE PRIVACY & DATA | GDPR 

GOOGLE PRIVACY & DATA | GDPR 

Bioherby.com Data Protection.

Google The Cookie Monster.

       El Patron del Mundo ?

HOW GOOGLE USES INFORMATION FROM SITES OR APPS THAT USE OUR SERVICES

Many websites and apps use Google services to improve their content and keep it free. When they integrate our services, these sites and apps share information with Google.

For example, when you visit a website that uses advertising services like AdSense, including analytics tools like Google Analytics, or embeds video content from YouTube, your web browser automatically sends certain information to Google. This includes the URL of the page you’re visiting and your IP address.

 

We may also set cookies on your browser or read cookies that are already there. Apps that use Google advertising services also share information with Google, such as the name of the app and a unique identifier for advertising.

Google uses the information shared by sites and apps to deliver our services, maintain and improve them, develop new services, measure the effectiveness of advertising, protect against fraud and abuse, and personalize content and ads you see on Google and on our partners’ sites and apps. See our Privacy Policy to learn more about how we process data for each of these purposes and our Advertising page for more about Google ads, how your information is used in the context of advertising, and how long Google stores this information.

Ad personalization

If ad personalization is turned on, Google will use your information to make your ads more useful for you. For example, a website that sells mountain bikes might use Google's ad services. After you visit that site, you could see an ad for mountain bikes on a different site that shows ads served by Google.

If ad personalization is off, Google will not collect or use your information to create an ad profile or personalize the ads Google shows to you. You will still see ads, but they may not be as useful. Ads may still be based on the topic of the website or app you're looking at, your current search terms, or on your general location, but not on your interests, search history, or browsing history. Your information can still be used for the other purposes mentioned above, such as to measure the effectiveness of advertising and protect against fraud and abuse.

When you interact with a website or app that uses Google services, you may be asked to choose whether you want to see personalized ads from ad providers, including Google. Regardless of your choice, Google will not personalize the ads you see if your ad personalization setting is off or your account is ineligible for personalized ads.

You can see and control what information we use to show you ads by visiting your ad settings.

How you can control the information collected by Google on these sites and apps

Here are some of the ways you can control the information that is shared by your device when you visit or interact with sites and apps that use Google services:

  • Ad Settings helps you control ads you see on Google services (such as Google Search or YouTube), or on non-Google websites and apps that use Google ad services. You can also learn how ads are personalized, opt out of ad personalization, and block specific advertisers.

  • If you are signed in to your Google Account, and depending on your Account settings, My Activity allows you to review and control data that’s created when you use Google services, including the information we collect from the sites and apps you have visited. You can browse by date and by topic, and delete part or all of your activity.

  • Incognito mode in Chrome allows you to browse the web without recording webpages and files in your browser or Account history (unless you choose to sign in). Cookies are deleted after you've closed all of your incognito windows and tabs, and your bookmarks and settings are stored until you delete them. Learn more about cookies.

  • Many browsers, including Chrome, allow you to block third-party cookies. You can also clear any existing cookies from within your browser. Learn more about managing cookies in Chrome.

ADVERTISING

Advertising keeps Google and many of the websites and services you use free of charge. We work hard to make sure that ads are safe, unobtrusive, and as relevant as possible. For example, you won’t see pop-up ads on Google, and we terminate the accounts of hundreds of thousands of publishers and advertisers that violate our policies each year – including ads containing malware, ads for counterfeit goods, or ads that attempt to misuse your personal information.

How Google uses cookies in advertising

Cookies help to make advertising more effective. Without cookies, it’s harder for an advertiser to reach its audience, or to know how many ads were shown and how many clicks they received.

Many websites, such as news sites and blogs, partner with Google to show ads to their visitors. Working with our partners, we may use cookies for a number of purposes, such as to stop you from seeing the same ad over and over again, to detect and stop click fraud, and to show ads that are likely to be more relevant (such as ads based on websites you have visited).

We store a record of the ads we serve in our logs. These server logs typically include your web request, IP address, browser type, browser language, the date and time of your request, and one or more cookies that may uniquely identify your browser. We store this data for a number of reasons, the most important of which are to improve our services and to maintain the security of our systems. We anonymize this log data by removing part of the IP address (after 9 months) and cookie information (after 18 months).

Our advertising cookies

To help our partners manage their advertising and websites, we offer many products, including AdSense, AdWords, Google Analytics, and a range of DoubleClick-branded services. When you visit a page or see an ad that uses one of these products, either on Google services or on other sites and apps, various cookies may be sent to your browser.

These may be set from a few different domains, including google.com, doubleclick.net, googlesyndication.com, or googleadservices.com, or the domain of our partners’ sites. Some of our advertising products enable our partners to use other services in conjunction with ours (like an ad measurement and reporting service), and these services may send their own cookies to your browser. These cookies will be set from their domains.

See more detail about the types of cookies used by Google and our partners and how we use them.

How you can control advertising cookies

You can use Ads Settings to manage the Google ads you see and opt out of Ads Personalization. Even if you opt out of Ads Personalization, you may still see ads based on factors such as your general location derived from your IP address, your browser type, and your search terms.

You can also manage many companies’ cookies used for online advertising via the consumer choice tools created under self-regulation programs in many countries, such as the US-based aboutads.info choices page or the EU-based Your Online Choices.

Finally, you can manage cookies in your web browser.

Other technologies used in advertising

Google’s advertising systems may use other technologies, including Flash and HTML5, for functions like display of interactive ad formats. We may use the IP address, for example, to identify your general location. We may also select advertising based on information about your computer or device, such as your device model, browser type, or sensors in your device like the accelerometer.

Location

Google’s ad products may receive or infer information about your location from a variety of sources. For example, we may use the IP address to identify your general location; we may receive precise location from your mobile device; we may infer your location from your search queries; and websites or apps that you use may send information about your location to us. Google uses location information in our ads products to infer demographic information, to improve the relevance of the ads you see, to measure ad performance and to report aggregate statistics to advertisers.

Advertising identifiers for mobile apps

To serve ads in services where cookie technology may not be available (for example, in mobile applications), we may use technologies that perform similar functions to cookies. Sometimes Google links the identifier used for advertising on mobile applications to an advertising cookie on the same device in order to coordinate ads across your mobile apps and mobile browser. This can happen, for example, when you see an ad within an app that launches a web page in your mobile browser. This also helps us improve the reports we give to our advertisers on the effectiveness of their campaigns.

To opt out of personalized ads in apps on your mobile device, follow the instructions below.

Android

  1. Find Google Settings in one of these places (depending on your device):

    1. A separate app called Google Settings

    2. In your main Settings app, scroll down and tap Google

  2. Tap Ads

  3. Switch on Opt out of interest-based ads

iOS

Devices with iOS use Apple’s Advertising Identifier. To learn more about your choices for use of this identifier, visit the Settings app on your device.

What determines the ads by Google that I see?

Many decisions are made to determine which ad you see.

Sometimes the ad you see is based on your current or past location. Your IP address is usually a good indication of your approximate location. So you might see an ad on the homepage of YouTube.com that promotes a forthcoming movie in your country, or a search for ‘pizza’ might return results for pizza places in your town.

Sometimes the ad you see is based on the context of a page. If you’re looking at a page of gardening tips, you might see ads for gardening equipment.

Sometimes you might also see an ad on the web that’s based on your app activity or activity on Google services; an in-app ad that’s based on your web activity; or an ad based on your activity on another device.

Sometimes the ad you see on a page is served by Google but selected by another company. For example, you might have registered with a newspaper website. From information you’ve given the newspaper, it can make decisions about which ads to show you, and it can use Google’s ad serving products to deliver those ads.

You may also see ads on Google products and services, including Search, Gmail, and YouTube, based on information, such as your email address, that you provided to advertisers and the advertisers then shared with Google.

Why am I seeing ads by Google for products I’ve viewed?

You may see ads for products you previously viewed. Let’s suppose you visit a website that sells golf clubs, but you don’t buy those clubs on your first visit. The website owner might want to encourage you to return and complete your purchase. Google offers services that let website operators target their ads to people who visited their pages.

For this to work, Google either reads a cookie that’s already in your browser or places a cookie in your browser when you visit the golfing site (assuming your browser lets this happen).

When you visit another site that works with Google, which may have nothing to do with golfing, you might see an ad for those golf clubs. That’s because your browser sends Google the same cookie. In turn, we may use that cookie to serve you an ad that could encourage you to buy those golf clubs.

Your visit to the golfing site may also be used by Google to show you personalized ads when you later search for golf clubs on Google.

We do have restrictions on this type of ad. For example, we prohibit advertisers from selecting an audience based on sensitive information, such as health information or religious beliefs.

Learn more about Google ads.

Why you're seeing an ad

When you see an ad from Google's network, you can see more details:

  • Google services, like Google Search, YouTube, or Gmail: Click Info    Why This Ad. 

  • Non-Google websites and apps that partner with Google to show ads: Click AdChoices .

Reasons you might see an ad

  • Your info:

    • Info in your Google Account, like your age range and gender

    • Your general location

  • Your activity:

    • Previous search activity

    • Your activity while you were signed in to Google

    • Your previous interactions with ads

    • Types of websites you visit

    • Types of mobile app activity on your device

    • Your activity on another device

  • Your current search query

  • Other info:

    • The time of day

    • Info you gave to an advertiser, like if you signed up for a newsletter with your email address

Google can personalize ads so they're more useful to you.

Personalized ads aren't shown or hidden from you based on sensitive categories, like race, religion, sexual orientation, or health.

Types of ads you might see

  • Ads on Google services: You might see ads with results on Google Search, or before you watch a video on YouTube.

  • Ads on non-Google websites and apps: Non-Google websites and apps (like a newspaper's website or a gaming app) partner with Google to show ads.

How Google works with advertisers

Ads are necessary for many websites to provide free services or information. Ads also help keep many Google services free.

As an ad network, Google connects:

  • People who own websites with ad space

  • People who want to promote a product

  • People who think the product is interesting

Google doesn't sell your personal info to anyone, and doesn't let anyone read your emails to show you ads.

  • Websites that host ads can only see info that you ask Google to share.

  • Advertisers can only see how well their ads are performing.

Learn more about how Google ads work.

Google's advertising standards

Google takes part in industry groups that create and follow standards in online advertising:

Related links

HOW GOOGLE USES COOKIES

A cookie is a small piece of text sent to your browser by a website you visit. It helps the website to remember information about your visit, like your preferred language and other settings. That can make your next visit easier and the site more useful to you. Cookies play an important role. Without them, using the web would be a much more frustrating experience.

We use cookies for many purposes. We use them, for example, to remember your safe search preferences, to make the ads you see more relevant to you, to count how many visitors we receive to a page, to help you sign up for our services, to protect your data, or to remember your ad settings.

You can see a list of the types of cookies used by Google and also find out how Google and our partners use cookies in advertising. Our privacy policy explains how we protect your privacy in our use of cookies and other information.

GOOGLE PRIVACY POLICY ENGLISH PDF DOWNLOAD.

ADVERTISING

Advertising keeps Google and many of the websites and services you use free of charge. We work hard to make sure that ads are safe, unobtrusive, and as relevant as possible. For example, you won’t see pop-up ads on Google, and we terminate the accounts of hundreds of thousands of publishers and advertisers that violate our policies each year – including ads containing malware, ads for counterfeit goods, or ads that attempt to misuse your personal information.

How Google uses cookies in advertising

Cookies help to make advertising more effective. Without cookies, it’s harder for an advertiser to reach its audience, or to know how many ads were shown and how many clicks they received.

Many websites, such as news sites and blogs, partner with Google to show ads to their visitors. Working with our partners, we may use cookies for a number of purposes, such as to stop you from seeing the same ad over and over again, to detect and stop click fraud, and to show ads that are likely to be more relevant (such as ads based on websites you have visited).

We store a record of the ads we serve in our logs. These server logs typically include your web request, IP address, browser type, browser language, the date and time of your request, and one or more cookies that may uniquely identify your browser. We store this data for a number of reasons, the most important of which are to improve our services and to maintain the security of our systems. We anonymize this log data by removing part of the IP address (after 9 months) and cookie information (after 18 months).

Our advertising cookies

To help our partners manage their advertising and websites, we offer many products, including AdSense, AdWords, Google Analytics, and a range of DoubleClick-branded services. When you visit a page or see an ad that uses one of these products, either on Google services or on other sites and apps, various cookies may be sent to your browser.

These may be set from a few different domains, including google.com, doubleclick.net, googlesyndication.com, or googleadservices.com, or the domain of our partners’ sites. Some of our advertising products enable our partners to use other services in conjunction with ours (like an ad measurement and reporting service), and these services may send their own cookies to your browser. These cookies will be set from their domains.

See more detail about the types of cookies used by Google and our partners and how we use them.

How you can control advertising cookies

You can use Ads Settings to manage the Google ads you see and opt out of Ads Personalization. Even if you opt out of Ads Personalization, you may still see ads based on factors such as your general location derived from your IP address, your browser type, and your search terms.

You can also manage many companies’ cookies used for online advertising via the consumer choice tools created under self-regulation programs in many countries, such as the US-based aboutads.info choices page or the EU-based Your Online Choices.

Finally, you can manage cookies in your web browser.

Other technologies used in advertising

Google’s advertising systems may use other technologies, including Flash and HTML5, for functions like display of interactive ad formats. We may use the IP address, for example, to identify your general location. We may also select advertising based on information about your computer or device, such as your device model, browser type, or sensors in your device like the accelerometer.

Location

Google’s ad products may receive or infer information about your location from a variety of sources. For example, we may use the IP address to identify your general location; we may receive precise location from your mobile device; we may infer your location from your search queries; and websites or apps that you use may send information about your location to us. Google uses location information in our ads products to infer demographic information, to improve the relevance of the ads you see, to measure ad performance and to report aggregate statistics to advertisers.

Advertising identifiers for mobile apps

To serve ads in services where cookie technology may not be available (for example, in mobile applications), we may use technologies that perform similar functions to cookies. Sometimes Google links the identifier used for advertising on mobile applications to an advertising cookie on the same device in order to coordinate ads across your mobile apps and mobile browser. This can happen, for example, when you see an ad within an app that launches a web page in your mobile browser. This also helps us improve the reports we give to our advertisers on the effectiveness of their campaigns.

To opt out of personalized ads in apps on your mobile device, follow the instructions below.

Android

  1. Find Google Settings in one of these places (depending on your device):

    1. A separate app called Google Settings

    2. In your main Settings app, scroll down and tap Google

  2. Tap Ads

  3. Switch on Opt out of interest-based ads

iOS

Devices with iOS use Apple’s Advertising Identifier. To learn more about your choices for use of this identifier, visit the Settings app on your device.

What determines the ads by Google that I see?

Many decisions are made to determine which ad you see.

Sometimes the ad you see is based on your current or past location. Your IP address is usually a good indication of your approximate location. So you might see an ad on the homepage of YouTube.com that promotes a forthcoming movie in your country, or a search for ‘pizza’ might return results for pizza places in your town.

Sometimes the ad you see is based on the context of a page. If you’re looking at a page of gardening tips, you might see ads for gardening equipment.

Sometimes you might also see an ad on the web that’s based on your app activity or activity on Google services; an in-app ad that’s based on your web activity; or an ad based on your activity on another device.

Sometimes the ad you see on a page is served by Google but selected by another company. For example, you might have registered with a newspaper website. From information you’ve given the newspaper, it can make decisions about which ads to show you, and it can use Google’s ad serving products to deliver those ads.

You may also see ads on Google products and services, including Search, Gmail, and YouTube, based on information, such as your email address, that you provided to advertisers and the advertisers then shared with Google.

Why am I seeing ads by Google for products I’ve viewed?

You may see ads for products you previously viewed. Let’s suppose you visit a website that sells golf clubs, but you don’t buy those clubs on your first visit. The website owner might want to encourage you to return and complete your purchase. Google offers services that let website operators target their ads to people who visited their pages.

For this to work, Google either reads a cookie that’s already in your browser or places a cookie in your browser when you visit the golfing site (assuming your browser lets this happen).

When you visit another site that works with Google, which may have nothing to do with golfing, you might see an ad for those golf clubs. That’s because your browser sends Google the same cookie. In turn, we may use that cookie to serve you an ad that could encourage you to buy those golf clubs.

Your visit to the golfing site may also be used by Google to show you personalized ads when you later search for golf clubs on Google.

We do have restrictions on this type of ad. For example, we prohibit advertisers from selecting an audience based on sensitive information, such as health information or religious beliefs.

Learn more about Google ads.

Safeguarding your data

This article summarizes Google Analytics’ data practices and commitment to protecting the confidentiality and security of data. Visitors to sites or apps using Google Analytics (aka “users”) may learn about our end user controls.

Site or app owners using Google Analytics (aka “customers”) may find this a useful resource, particularly if they are businesses affected by the European Economic Area’s General Data Protection Regulation. See also the Google privacy policy and Google’s site for customers and partners.

Information for Visitors of Sites and Apps Using Google Analytics

Our privacy policy

At Google, we are keenly aware of the trust you place in us and our responsibility to keep your privacy and data secure. As part of this responsibility, we let you know what information we collect when you use our products and services, why we collect it, and how we use it to improve your experience. The Google privacy policy & principles describes how we treat personal information when you use Google's products and services, including Google Analytics.

Google Analytics cookies and identifiers

Google Analytics mainly uses first-party cookies to report on visitor (aka. user) interactions on Google Analytics customers’ websites. Users may disable cookies or delete any individual cookie. Learn more

In addition, Google Analytics supports an optional browser add-on that - once installed and enabled - disables measurement by Google Analytics for any site a user visits. Note that this add-on only disables Google Analytics measurement.

Where a site or app uses Google Analytics for Apps or the Google Analytics for Firebase SDKs, Google Analytics collects an app-instance identifier — a randomly generated number that identifies a unique installation of an App. Whenever a user resets their Advertising Identifier (Advertising ID on Android, and ID for Advertisers on iOS), the app-instance identifier is also reset.

Where sites or apps have implemented Google Analytics with other Google Advertising products, like Google Ads, additional advertising identifiers may be collected. Users can opt-out of this feature and manage their settings for this cookie using the Ads SettingsLearn more

Google Analytics also collects Internet Protocol (IP) addresses to provide and protect the security of the service, and to give website owners a sense of which country, state, or city in the world their users come from (also known as "IP geolocation"). Google Analytics provides a method to mask IPs that are collected (detailed below) but note that website owners have access to their users’ IP addresses even if the website owners do not use Google Analytics.

Information for Sites and Apps Using Google Analytics

Google as a data processor

Google operates as a data processor for Google Analytics. This is reflected in our Ads Data Processing Terms, which are available to all Google Analytics customers with direct contracts with Google. Learn more

Google Analytics is a data processor under GDPR because Google Analytics collects and processes data on behalf of our clients, pursuant to their instructions. Our customers are data controllers who retain full rights over the collection, access, retention, and deletion of their data at any time. Google’s use of data is controlled by the terms of its contract with Google Analytics customers and any settings enabled by customers through the user interface of our product.

Data Collected by Google Analytics

First-party Cookies

Google Analytics collects first-party cookies, data related to the device/browser, IP address and on-site/app activities to measure and report statistics about user interactions on the websites and/or apps that use Google Analytics. Customers may customize cookies and the data collected with features like cookie settingsUser-IDData Import, and Measurement ProtocolLearn more

Google Analytics customers who have for instance, enabled the analytics.js or gtag.js collection method can control whether or not they use cookies to store a pseudonymous or random client identifier. If the customer decides to set a cookie, the information stored in the local first-party cookie is reduced to a random identifier (e.g., 12345.67890).

For customers who use the Google Analytics for Apps SDK, we collect an App Instance Identifier, which is a number that is randomly generated when the user installs an app for the first time.

Advertising identifiers

Where customers use Google Analytics Advertising Features, Google advertising cookies are collected and used to enable features like Remarketing on the Google Display Network. These features are subject to the users’ Ads Settings, the Policy requirements for Google Analytics Advertising Featuresand Google’s EU User Consent policy, which requires customers to obtain consent for cookies where legally required—including consent for personalized ads. For more information about how Google uses advertising cookies, visit the Google Advertising Privacy FAQ. It is possible to implement Google Analytics without affecting normal data collection where Advertising features are disabled until consent is obtained.

IP Address

Google Analytics uses IP addresses to derive the geolocation of a visitor, and to protect the service and provide security to our customers. Customers may apply IP masking so that Google Analytics uses only a portion of an IP address collected, rather than the entire address. In addition, customers can override IPs at will using our IP Override feature.

PII Prohibition

Our contracts prohibit customers from sending Personally Identifiable Information to Google Analytics. Customers should follow these Best Practices to ensure PII is not sent to Google Analytics.

What is the data used for?

Google uses Google Analytics data to provide the Google Analytics measurement service to customers. Identifiers such as cookies and app instance IDs are used to measure user interactions with a customer’s sites and/or apps, while IP addresses are used to provide and protect the security of the service, and to give the customer a sense of where in the world their users come from.

Data access

We do not share Google Analytics data without the customer’s authorization (including via settings in the product user interface), or as otherwise expressly permitted under the terms of their Google Analytics agreement, except in limited circumstances when required by law.

Customers may control their own access to data in their Analytics accounts or properties by configuring view and edit permissions for employees or other representatives who may login to their Analytics account. Learn more

Security-dedicated engineering teams at Google guard against external threats to data. Internal access to data (e.g., by employees) is limited by strict access controls (both internal policy controls and automated technical controls such as authentication, SSL, and security logs) to only those with a business need to access it.

Product linking summary

Where customers link their Analytics property to another Google product or service account (“Integration Partner”), certain data from that Analytics property may be accessed and exported into the linked account. Once data is exported through a linking integration, it becomes subject to the Integration Partner’s terms and policies. Learn more

Note that once data is sent to an Integration Partner, that the data sent is subject to the terms of that Integration Partner and that Google Analytics no longer maintains access or control over that data.

Customers may review and manage their product integration linkings at any time within the Analytics product linking summary user interface.

Data Sharing

Google Analytics provides several data sharing settings to customers, through which customers may customize how data collected using an Analytics data collection method (like the JavaScript code, mobile SDKs, and the Measurement Protocol) may be accessed and used by Google according to customer preferences. Note that these settings only apply to data collected from websites, mobile apps, and other digital devices using Analytics; they do not apply to data relating to a customer’s use of Analytics, such as the number of properties and which additional features are configured. Regardless of a customer’s data sharing settings, Analytics data may also be used only insofar as necessary to maintain and protect the Analytics service. Learn more

Data Controls for retention, deletion and portability

Data Retention

With the Data Retention controls, customers can limit or expand the duration for which their user-level and event-level data is stored in Google Analytics servers. All customers should review their Data Retention settings and ensure the appropriate retention is selected.

User Deletion

Customers may delete a single user’s data from Google Analytics by passing a single user identifier to the Google Analytics User Deletion API.

User-level Data Access and Portability

Customers may pull event information for any given user identifier via our User Explorer report. This feature enables customers to analyze and export event level data for a single user. In addition, our 360 customers may integrate with BigQuery to create a full export of all event data associated with their users in a single queryable repository.

Data privacy and security

Certifications

EU Privacy Shield

The U.S. Department of Commerce has approved Google's certification to the Privacy Shield as fully compliant. View our Privacy Shield certification.

ISO 27001

Google has earned ISO 27001 certification for the systems, applications, people, technology, processes, and data centers serving a number of Google products, including Google Analytics. Download our certificate here (PDF) or learn more about ISO 27001.

Information security

In web-based computing, security of both data and applications is critical. Google dedicates significant resources towards securing applications and data handling to prevent unauthorized access to data.

Data is stored in an encoded format optimized for performance, rather than stored in a traditional file system or database manner. Data is dispersed across a number of physical and logical volumes for redundancy and expedient access, thereby obfuscating it from tampering.

Google applications run in a multi-tenant, distributed environment. Rather than segregating each customer's data onto a single machine or set of machines, data from all Google users (consumers, business, and even Google's own data) is distributed among a shared infrastructure composed of Google's many homogeneous machines and located in Google's data centers.

In addition, Google Analytics ensures secure transmission of its JavaScript libraries and measurement data. Google Analytics by default uses HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS), which instructs browsers that support HTTP over SSL (HTTPS) to use that encryption protocol for all communication between end users, websites, and Google Analytics servers. Learn more

Operational security and disaster recovery

To minimize service interruption due to hardware failure, natural disaster, or other catastrophe, Google implements a comprehensive disaster-recovery program at all of its data centers. This program includes multiple components to eliminate single points of failure, including the following:

Data replication To help ensure availability in the event of a disaster, Google Analytics data stored in Google's distributed file system is replicated to separate systems in different data centers.

Geographical distribution of data centers Google operates a geographically distributed set of data centers that is designed to maintain service continuity in the event of a disaster or other incident in a single region.

Resilient and redundant infrastructure Google's computing clusters are designed with resiliency and redundancy in mind, helping minimize single points of failure and the impact of common equipment failures and environmental risks.

Continuity plan in the event of disaster In addition to the redundancy of data and regionally disparate data centers, Google also has a business-continuity plan for its headquarters in Mountain View, CA. This plan accounts for major disasters, such as a seismic event or a public-health crisis, and it assumes people and services may be unavailable for up to 30 days. This plan is designed to enable continued operations of our services for our customers.

What are the other Google products that incorporate this policy?

In addition to ads and measurement products, this policy is referenced in the Google Maps APIs Terms of Service, the YouTube API Services Terms of Service, the G+ Buttons policy, the reCAPTCHA Terms of Service, and in Blogger & Re-marketing.

Other Resources

For more information about the GDPR and its application to digital publishers and advertising:

Article 29 Working Party guidance on Consent under the GDPR (2018)

Article 29 Working Party guidance on Transparency under the GDPR (2018)

Article 29 Working Party guidance on Legitimate Interests (2014)

Five Practical Steps to help companies comply with the E-Privacy Directive (2015) IAB Europe 

For regulatory guidance on cookie consent in advertising:

Article 29 Working Party guidance on obtaining consent for cookies (PDF, 2013)

Article 29 Working Party guidance on cookie consent exemption (PDF, 2012)

Article 29 Working Party guidance on online behavioural advertising (PDF, 2010)

Need help ?  Independent Organisations about Cookies.

www.aboutcookies.org  

www.youronlinechoices.eu,

 

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Bioherby - September 10- 2018.